How to Opt Out of Early Warning Services

(June 2024)

How to Opt Out of Early Warning Services

In This Article

Are you having issues opening a bank account due to an entry in Early Warning Services? You sure can opt out of Early Warning Services if you follow this guide.

Early Warning Services is a consumer reporting agency, much like the credit bureaus, that provides banks with information about your financial condition and history. Finding and reporting fraudulent activity connected to your checking and savings accounts is the main goal of EWS.

Read this article to grab the full gist on how to opt out of Early Warning Services.

To know how to opt out of Early Warning Services:

1. Get Familiar With Early Warning Services
2. Analyze the Information in Your Early Warning Services Report
3. Dispute an Item on Your EWS Report
4. Create a Markup Copy of Your Early Warning Credit Report
5. Send Early Warning a Credit Dispute Letter
6. Attach Proof Documents
7. Ensure You Have a Copy of Your Letter and Attachments
8. Respond to Early Warning’s Result

Ready? Let’s roll!

1. Get Familiar With Early Warning Services

To get out of Early Warning Services, get familiar with the agency.

Early Warning Services gathers and reports information on your record of checking and savings accounts rather than providing reports on credit card and loan payments. Keep in mind EWS concentrates on illegal activity; its database keeps track of consumer complaints about banks as well as crimes.

2. Analyze the Information in Your Early Warning Services Report

To get out of Early Warning Services, analyze the information in your Early Warning Services report.

Your EWS report contains the following information:

  • Your name, address, phone number(s), birthdate, and Social Security number.
  • Information on checking and savings accounts, including bank names, account starting and closure dates, balances, account histories and banking activity.
  • List of businesses that most recently requested your EWS report.

When you apply for a bank account, institutions that use Early Warning Services may reject your application if they discover unfavorable information in your EWS data.

3. Dispute an Item on Your EWS Report

To opt out of Early Warning Services, dispute an item on your EWS report.

Make a direct dispute with the bank if you discover any mistakes. Follow the guidelines on the report to file a dispute with EWS as well.

Gather the following data:

  • Your Consumer ID number from the EWS report
  • A thorough explanation of the item you are disputing. Include the routing and account numbers for any bank accounts that have inaccurate information.
  • An accurate explanation of the dispute, demonstrating how and why the information is inaccurate.
  • Copies of all documentation and evidences

4. Create a Markup Copy of Your Early Warning Credit Report

To get out of Early Warning Services, create a markup copy of your Early Warning credit report.

Make a copy of each report you are studying first so you may highlight any points you want to challenge.

You will need this “markup” copy in order to help your attorney create a timeline of the disagreements in the event that you must file a lawsuit.

Simply photocopy your Early Warning report to create a markup copy. Highlight and indicate with an asterisk the information you feel is incorrect. To preserve the original copy for future use as evidence, place it away—preferably in a page protector.

5. Send Early Warning a Credit Dispute Letter

To opt out of Early Warning Services, send Early Warning a credit dispute letter.

Your dispute letter serves two main objectives:

  • To notify the credit bureau of the inaccuracy or other issue.
  • To give the credit bureau the evidence it needs to update your report.

Ensure the letters state what is incorrect with the report and why—and be factual, without showing any emotion.

6. Attach Proof Documents

To get out of Early Warning Services, attach proof documents.

Include any supporting documentation you may have in your letter to demonstrate your point of view. For example, you should enclose a copy of your driver’s license or other photo ID if you are disputing your birthdate or present address.

You should include account statements with the balance if you plan to dispute whether you paid off a debt. Include any supporting documentation you believe will be useful in proving the accuracy or veracity of the facts in the report.

7. Ensure You Have a Copy of Your Letter and Attachments

To opt out of Early Warning Services, ensure you have a copy of your letter and attachments.

If you want to maintain copies of your dispute, do not rely on Early Warning. Send your dispute via certified mail with a return receipt requested. Make a complete photocopy of the disagreement in the same format you send to Early Warning, with all of the exhibits and the signatory included.

If you need to refer back to these copies or use them as evidence, store them safely somewhere where they can be found quickly.

8. Respond to Early Warning's Result

To get out of Early Warning Services, respond to Early Warning’s result.

Review the response to see if there is any further information or supporting documents that may be used to support your dispute if Early Warning rejects it. You may not provide enough details to persuade the agency that its data is inaccurate. You may submit your challenge letter again with new supporting materials, but be aware that doing is sometimes frivolous and can reduce your chances of later having the item removed. If you have any other information, share it.

Additionally, submit a new disagreement to Early Warning and request that it conduct an investigation based on the new documents if there is further evidence that can support your claims. You should request that Early Warning provide a thorough justification for rejecting your arguments after showing all the data and supporting documents you have.

Conclusion

To opt out of Early Warning Services, familiarize yourself with Early Warning Services, analyze the information in your EWS report, dispute an item on your EWS report.

Keep in mind to create a markup copy of your Early Warning credit report, send Early Warning a credit dispute letter, attach proof documents. Ensure you have a copy of your letter and attachments, lastly, respond to Early Warning’s result.

Become a

S'witty Kiwi Credit Insider!

Get the latest credit tips and hacks in your inbox!